Kosovo Free Trade Agreement

The volume of bilateral trade between Turkey and Kosovo amounted to approximately $289 million in 2013 and 2014 and amounted to $248.750 million in 2015. Turkish exports to Kosovo ($279, $276 million and $240.8 million in 2013, 2014 and 2015) account for a significant share of this reciprocal trade volume. Trade with the region has increased by almost 130% over the past decade, with total trade between the EU and the Western Balkans reaching €55 billion in 2019. Following Kosovo`s declaration of independence on 17 February 2008, UNMIK continued to take Kosovo`s place at all CEFTA meetings. At the end of 2008, Kosovo changed its customs marks and replaced a MIMIK with Kosovo. The result has been a trade blockade of Serbia and Bosnia, which the Republic of Kosovo does not recognize. [6] The Pristina government has done the same by blocking its own imports from Serbia. This led to clashes at border crossings in July 2011. [7] Trade plays an important role in the EU`s efforts to promote peace, stability, freedom and economic prosperity in the Western Balkans. Overall, this expansion has been beneficial for the Western Balkan partners; Over the past decade, the region has increased its exports to the EU by 207% compared to a more modest increase in EU exports to the region of 94%. The Joint Declaration on cooperation provides that, if conditions permit, the EFTA States and Kosovo shall jointly examine the measures to be taken with a view to the creation of a free trade area between them. On the RECOMMENDATION of the EU, future members were preparing to become members by creating free trade areas.

Much of CEFTA`s external trade is linked to EU countries. The EU has concluded trade agreements with around 70 third countries. The agreements facilitate access to the markets of these countries for products and services provided by Finnish companies. In collaboration with the Ministries of Finance and Customs, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has developed instructions to help businesses take advantage of the tariff reductions offered by trade agreements. As soon as a participating country joins the European Union (EU), its accession to CEFTA ends. Since 1 July 2013, the parties to CEFTA have been on behalf of Kosovo: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Moldova, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia and UNMIK. . . .